The peat free power of wool & bracken

by | May 25, 2016 | News, Products | 0 comments

A?new peat free compost with power-packed nutrients, to help the UK?s growing flock of kitchen gardeners get the best results from cultivating their vegetables and salads, has been launched by Dalefoot Composts.

Whether you garden in a backyard, balcony, windowsill or allotment, Dalefoot Composts? new Wool Compost for Vegetables & Salads has been perfectly blended using nature?s finest ingredients to help you grow nutritious and delicious crops. Made from sheep?s wool and bracken from the Cumbrian Fells, the peat free compost contains an ideal balance of nutrients to grow not only veg and salads but also fruit. Benefits include:

  • Natural water retention of wool fibres means up to 50% less watering.
  • Wool provides a steady, slow sustained supply of nitrogen.
  • High levels of natural potash from the bracken promotes flowering and fruiting, healthy growth and hearty crops – NO need for any additional plant food.
  • Made from totally renewable resources with great environmental benefits.

Wool Compost for Vegetables & Salads is the latest peat free product in the Dalefoot Composts range. The range already boasts Wool Compost (potting & containers), Wool Compost for Seeds, Double Strength Wool Compost, Wool Compost Ericaceous (for acid-loving plants) and Lakeland Gold (claybuster and mulch). All of the composts are made at Dalefoot Farm in the Lake District.

Simon Bland from Dalefoot Composts said: ?If you?re growing herbs on your windowsill, spuds in a potato sack, beans in your back garden or award-winning produce on an allotment, our new compost will give you the best results. We?ve worked hard to create the ideal mix of all-natural, peat free ingredients to grow the finest. Just like our other composts, Wool Compost for Vegetables & Salads has a similarly soft texture to peat but is completely carbon neutral, so can help you garden more sustainably. It also has the added bonus of up to 50% less watering and no need for added plant food.?

A blooming number of professional growers are using the Wool Compost range, as well a number of giant veg growers including Ian Neale who last autumn tipped the scales with the UK?s heaviest tomato. Many of the growers helped trial the new Wool Compost for Vegetables & Salad.

www.dalefootcomposts.co.uk

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